TWO WEEDS AND A MOTH

COMMON MULLEIN
COMMON MULLEIN
COMMON MULLEIN
COMMON MULLEIN

Common mullein is considered a weed and it is usually found in places where the ground has been disturbed, such as a ditch. You may see these plants along roadsides, stream sides, and forest edges. They are full sun plants. They can grow up to ten feet tall and the flowers only bloom a few at a time. Common mullein serve as a shelter for some insects in the winter because of the large leaves. Some bugs, such as stink bugs or grasshoppers, use this plant for food. Goldfinches and buntings will eat the seeds from this plant.

FOXTAIL GRASSFoxtail is a grass that is also treated as a weed. This grass has a seed awn, the bristle-like part of the larger cluster, which functions as a seed dispersal mechanism. These awns are razor-sharp and made to burrow in the ground. These are bad for animals, as they can dig into their noses, ears, eyes, mouth, or toes. Because the seeds do not break down, they can cause injury, such as abscesses, swelling, or pain if they get lodged. The foxtail name comes from the distinct resemblance to a foxes tail.

CTENUCHID MOTH

CTENUCHID MOTH
CTENUCHID MOTH

The Ctenuchid moth appears to be in the shape of an elongated net-winged beetle. These moths can be found in meadows and they feed on different grasses. The caterpillars of this moth have multiple tufts of white and yellow. Metamorphosis occurs between May and August. They use various grasses or irises as host plants. The ctenuchid moth of the American southwest has yellow veins on the brown forewings, while those of the southeast and coastal regions have brown wings with brown veins. I began seeing the caterpillars of this moth in the ponderosa pine forest in northern Arizona back in May. The adult moths have emerged in scores over the past few weeks.CTENUCHID MOTH

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s