THE HIGH DESERT

PRICKLEY PEAR
PRICKLEY PEAR
GLOBEMALLOW
GLOBEMALLOW

There are many areas in the western United States to be considered a desert. A desert can generally be defined as a region with a sparse amount of water, with an annual rainfall of fewer than 9.75 inches. The high desert reference is generally considered inland areas with high-elevation of at least 2000 feet or more above sea level. There are high desert places in California, Oregon, and the Four Corners/Colorado Plateau region in North America. Dry heat is a reference common to these areas, it is associated with relatively low humidity while in the heat. It is more comfortable for the body to deal with lower humidity because perspiration evaporates in dry heat, which makes the body cool. Perspiration does not evaporate in high humidity and causes the body to feel hotter while your clothes stay wet.

There are many different life forms in the various ranges of elevation. Wildflowers, cacti, juniper and joshua trees, many reptiles, birds, bugs, and of course so much more. They are all adapted to the dryness and survive quite well. The contrast of colors can be quite amazing.

BUMBLEBEE, AZ ABOUT 2500 FEET
SAGUARO AND OCOTILLO IN BUMBLEBEE, AZ ABOUT 2500 FEET
JOSHUA TREE
JOSHUA TREE, CA  ABOUT 4000 FEET
CALIFORNIA CHOLLA AROUND 4000 FEET
CALIFORNIA CHOLLA AROUND 4000 FEET
HIGH DESERT ABOUT 5500 FEET
NORTHERN ARIZONA HIGH DESERT ABOUT 5500 FEET
HIGH DESERT ABOUT 6000
NORTHERN ARIZONA HIGH DESERT ABOUT 6000
OAK CREEK CANYON 6500 FEET
OAK CREEK CANYON AROUND 6500 FEET

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDIAN BLANKET
INDIAN BLANKET
MEXICAN POPPY
MEXICAN POPPY
CLARET CUP
CLARET CUP

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s