WHITE LINED SPHINX MOTH

SPHINX MOTH
SPHINX MOTH ON COYOTE MINT
SPHIX MOTH AND PENSTEMEN
SPHIX MOTH AND PENSTEMON

The White-lined Sphinx moth is also known as the hummingbird moth or hawk moth. Their range extends from Central America through the U.S. and into parts of Canada, flying in many habitats including deserts and gardens. The hummingbird moth reference comes from their rapid wing movement while they hover over flowers while feeding. They also rapidly move back and forth over larva or feeding areas. Their life cycle consists of egg, larva, pupa, and adult. It begins by up to 1000 eggs being laid on the underside of plants. At the larva stage, they become large caterpillars of varying colors, that burrow into the soil, then go into chrysalis (pupa) for two-three weeks before emerging as adults. As adults, they have stout bodies with long narrow forewings and shorter hindwings. They can have a wingspan from two to five inches. They are pollinators to flowers such as orchids, petunias, lilacs, clovers, honeysuckles and evening primrose by sucking nectar with their long proboscis, which can exceed 10 inches. The primrose is their chief source of food, they are dependent on them as larvae and through adult life. They are active day and night. Sphinx moths are among some of the largest flying insects in North America.

SPHINX MOTH AND SHOWY EVENING PRIMROSE
SPHINX MOTH AND SHOWY EVENING PRIMROSE
SPHINX MOTH AND SHOWY EVENING PRIMROSE
SPHINX MOTH AND SHOWY EVENING PRIMROSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPHINX MOTH AND BROAD TAIL HUMMINGBIRD
Here is a white-lined sphinx moth and a broad-tail hummingbird feeding from the same area of penstemon flowers.

 

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